Authority Website Income
Shares

The Best WayBack Machine Alternative

The wayback machine at archive.org has recently made changes and as a result it had me and my team scrambling to find an alternative.

April Business Update – My done for you private blog network service has re-opened with 15 spots. If interested in reserving your spot please sign up here. If interested in a larger custom order please contact me.

Archive.org has been a key part of my processes for a few years! It along with MajestiSEO.com is(was) the best source to review a site to see if it had been abused.

The WayBack machine now only shows the history for live sites. Meaning if a domain is expired it will simply give an error. My hope is this is a bug with the new site and it will be fixed shortly but for those of us that are finding clean expired domains an alternative is needed!

You can provide feedback to Archive.org here

jon

ScreenShots.com is the best WayBack Machine Alternative

There are many alternatives however most of them focus on providing a service of monitoring pages you select moving forward (such as Stillio.com).

We need something that will show how a site looked historically and ScreenShots.com will do this.

shots

 Pros

  • It shows exactly how the site looked including images
  • Has very good historical coverage compared to any other alternative
  • Shows additional DomainTools information in a handy reference window

Cons

  • Site is only an image and can’t not see destination of links
  • Sometimes the image is too low of resolution to read text/anchor text
  • Does not have as good of historical coverage as archive.org

Another alternative which is not as good but does the job is http://archive.today/ 

Changes to Our PBN Building and Domain Finding System:

Instead of checking Archive.org we must now…

The results will be the same with a complete backlink and archive check but it will result in increased complexity when building PBNs.

 

About the Author Jon Haver

I am a 31 year old husband, father of 2, engineer and a huge fan of developing systems to build useful and profitable websites. The reason I build online businesses is to provide financial independence for my family and yours. I am not a GURU but just a regular guy who is grinding out 12+hr days to build a life for my family on terms.
Jon Haver, Online Entrepreneur

Leave a Comment:

17 comments
Doug says April 6, 2015

At least we know its a bug with Archive.org and will be fixed http://archive.org/post/1035328/what-happened-cant-view-my-archived-websites-anymore

Reply
    Jon Haver says April 7, 2015

    Hi Doug, thanks for pointing out that thread. Glad they have it all fixed now.

    Reply
john Devlin says April 6, 2015

Ive spent the best part of 24 hours fretting over this, and just when I was about to give in and switch tactics, I thought I would see if there was anything about it here, and hey presto. Jon on the ball as per usual, thanks pal. I can relax a little now!

Reply
    Jon Haver says April 7, 2015

    haha…glad I was able to help John!

    Reply
GDB says April 6, 2015

Thanks so much for posting this! I hope they sort it out quickly. I’m in the evil business of ‘restoring’ expired domains including the text content. Using the old content has served me well and I was surprised to see nothing but ‘robots.txt’ errors on Wayback today.

Reply
    Jon Haver says April 7, 2015

    Hi GDB…I strongly discourage reusing old content as it opens up a whole ethical and legal question I don’t understand.

    Reply
      GDB says April 8, 2015

      I feel people make a bigger deal out of this in theory than it is in practice. These sites and domains have been long abandoned and forgotten 99,9% of the time. And more often than not they’re old domains for small businesses that have gone out of business and only contained a few pages.

      I leave out any irrelevant information like old contact details and forms and point visitors to ‘real’ websites that provide current information in the case of an animal rescue PBN I have.

      At the end of the day the old owners don’t suffer. visitors actually end up on a working website with useful information and I profit by slipping a few links in there on the homepage.

      Should anyone contact me with a complaint about using their old content, I’ll simply take it down. No problem. No questions asked. No discussion.

      But it simply hasn’t happened yet. I’ve had more trouble with people (wrongly) complaining about 100% unique and personally written content on my real sites just because I outrank them than I’ve had issues with people contacting me about my PBN content.

      I also only operate a handful of PBN domains and not thousands like you and other well known PBNers do. So maybe that also plays a role.

      At the end of the day everyone needs to decide for themselves what they’re comfortable with. But doing it this way has served me well over the past 1,5 years. And at the end of the day the worst that will happen in practice is an email in your inbox asking you to remove the content.

      Reply
Filippo says April 7, 2015

Hi Jon, Wayback Machine is working properly again 😉

Reply
    Jon Haver says April 7, 2015

    Thanks for letting us know…glad they got it fixed.

    At least in the future I know where to send my team if Archive goes down.

    Reply
Jim says April 7, 2015

Jon thanks for the archive.today link, I’ll have a look at that.
I wanted to comment on screenshots.com though. Apart from the cons that you already mention I must add that as it just shows screenshots you have no way of knowing if you are seeing content on the domain or content as the result of a redirect. This can make a big difference in the value of a domain IMO.

Reply
    Jon Haver says April 7, 2015

    I wasn’t aware of the redirect issue…thanks for letting us know.

    Reply
Gabi says April 7, 2015

Hey Jon,

I’ve been struggling with this all weekend, I though there was something wrong with my browser! LOL! I started looking for alternatives but couldn’t come up with anything useful, until I got your email. It’s good to know there are viable options since it’s always a danger to rely on only one source for information.

Thanks so much Jon for keeping us in the loop and always providing such awesome content!

Gabi

Reply
    Jon Haver says April 7, 2015

    Hi Gabi…glad I was able to help!

    Reply
Derek Smith says May 5, 2015

This scared me too for some time Jon, I love the old archive.org look and feel and I use it alot in my business of find old websites. I think using a combination of site shots with archive.org is best if you actually want to get a look on how a site looks to the user.

Reply
Steve says July 20, 2015

waybackmachine has from the 1990’s
What other site has this??

Reply
zach says September 8, 2015

John, I don’t think these are “bugs”. The Waybackmachine and Internaet Archive have sold out to improve revenue streams. Their interface has been purposely crippled and dumbed-down, while providing lots of useless information and opportunities to divulge private information or join a subscription service. The WayBackMachine was a real eye sore for Elsevier and other copyright holders who have placed old works previously in the public domain back into copyright. Since Elsevier has made so much money by stealing our cultural heritage and science and placing it behind paywalls, the supposed non-profit IA is now following suit and being influenced by these people who have corrupted the organization. Although IA is non-profit, I have no doubt it is “expanding” and salaries and endowments are going up. A corrupt non-profit is no different than a corrupt profit.

Reply
Simon says June 15, 2016

Hi Jon

I came here as archive.org is down right now and I was in need of checking an old site (nothing to do with PBNS in this instance). Hopefully they’ll fix it soon, as while screenshots.com is handy, not being able to check links and navigate means it is of limited value.

Also, for info, you have a space after the link to this site http://archive.today which results in an error for anybody clicking it.

Cheers!
Simon

Reply
Add Your Reply